Archive for July, 2009

Oh Wonderful Music

Thursday, July 30th, 2009

I like Bobby McFerrin, and this is part of the reason why. He just thinks in wonderful ways. And helps us to get there too. Thanks to my facebook friend Michael who posted this!

World Science Festival 2009: Bobby McFerrin Demonstrates the Power of the Pentatonic Scale from World Science Festival on Vimeo.

Wildcrafting tweets – another 10

Monday, July 27th, 2009

Follow me on twitter, or read every 10 tweets posted here and also on AnnArbor.com. IF you go to AnnArbor.com just search for wildcrafting or Linda Diane and you’ll see a list of the blog posts.

for lunch: purslane stir fried with tempeh, garlic, & greens with a bit of tamari and Thai hot sauce at the end. Found a purslane hot spot!less than 5 seconds ago from web

Yesterday I “captured” Jewel Weed seeds and they were a mild nutty taste treat. Hold your hand around the exploding seed pod & trigger it.less than 5 seconds ago from web

latest annarbor.com blog on St. Johns Wort, nerve regeneration, and shingles http://bit.ly/2JXNAvless than 5 seconds ago from web

Those lovely honeysuckle berries you’re seeing everywhere? Most are toxic. Don’t eat them.8:54 AM Jul 26th from web

St. John’s Wort is know for depression, it’s a powerful nerve healer and also antiviral. Perfect for shingles – nerve pain from virus attack11:32 PM Jul 25th from web

St. Johns Wort showed up in my yard, I picked it, and tonight I have a shingles attack. SJW is the best remedy for me. SJW oil topically.11:31 PM Jul 25th from web

My friends are reporting in-black raspberry season is over in this part of the woods. It was a great year for them! All years are different.10:01 PM Jul 25th from web

Found a small patch of St. John’s Wort at my lake cabin. Picked flowering tops 2 tincture. Photos to follow on my annarbor.com blog tomorrow7:27 PM Jul 25th from web

my favorite black raspberry patch had two ripe berries only. I fear the season is finally over. Always a sad moment.8:58 PM Jul 24th from txt

Latest blog post for annarbor.com http://bit.ly/z77xh12:49 PM Jul 24th from web

Next 10 Wildcrafting Tips and Tweets

Friday, July 24th, 2009

Follow me on twitter, or check here every few days. Also, my blog at annarbor.com!

# wildcrafting
Photo of pig weed http://bit.ly/18jQwt and look for red stem near base.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Pig weed – a form of amaranth – may be a weed in your garden. Red near the base. Best to cook the leaves as a pot green. Calcium and more.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
The wildcrafting blog is now live on annarbor.com Search for Linda Diane Feldt of wildcrafting. There are three posts so far, and photos!less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Purslane – packed with nutrients, similar to fish oil and flax, great raw in salads, some like it cooked. Creeping in your garden. Eat it!about 15 hours ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Bee Balm, Bergamont, is flowering so easier to ID. Flower is almost round, almost clover like. Crush a leaf and smell – oregano like odor.9:08 PM Jul 22nd from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Friday July 24 my wildcrafting blog is a regular part of annarbor.com I have three queued up. Suggestions on topics?9:06 PM Jul 22nd from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
The sky blue flowers now abundant are likely Chicory. Most common use is the roots – roasted & ground for coffee subst. Roots high in inulin5:00 PM Jul 21st from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Herbal First Aid and Prevention for Your Pet with Linda Diane Feldt sponsored by People’s Food Co-op ยท Jul 23 7-8:30 p.m. at Crazy Wisdom8:33 PM Jul 20th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Grape and Virginia creeper vines often grow near poison ivy. “Leaflets three let them be” is good advice. PI takes many forms and disguises6:39 PM Jul 20th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Grape and Virginia creeper tendrils make a fun sour addition to a salad. The younger the better, cut into small pieces for a taste treat.6:38 PM Jul 20th from web

Newspapers – a self centered post

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Tomorrow is the last day that I’ll have a daily newspaper. Maybe the last day every. That’s something to ponder.

Because for as long as I can remember, and certainly for longer than 40 years, I’ve read the daily newspaper. My parents always subscribed, I talked them into the second subscription to the Detroit Free Press once we got to Ann Arbor, and I kept up that enthusiasm when I was living on my own. At the height of my addiction, I got The Ann Arbor News, The Free Press and the New York Times daily. I stopped the Free Press years ago, then started reading the Times on line and dropped down to Sunday only.

This will be weird.

Getting mail is no longer a thing. Many days I don’t even get any, since I’m on the junk mail removal list. Now no paper, except two days a week. The shift to this lap top becomes stronger and more central to my life.

I like reading the paper where ever. In the bath, in the sauna, at the lake, while traveling (and leaving it behind). The sensation of newsprint folding and piling up. The habits of scanning and deciding what to read. There is so much richness and texture there.

It may be time, it may be a thing of the past, but that doesn’t mean I can’t mourn it. Slow news, slow delivery, journalists who work on stories and they are held for publication later. It is all changed now. I’ve been a part of dozens of news stories, form now on no more clippings. I even have my own “column” – a long time dream – but it is really just a blog. And it may never be in newsprint.

The Ann Arbor News particularly has been a great paper, has been a bad paper, it has been enjoyable, it has been infuriating. It has been constant. I’ve been a daily subscriber/reader since before we moved back in 1971 – because taking the daily paper was a way to feel part of the community before we got here. So for 38 years plus, I’ve been a reader. Almost 14,000 papers.

I’m worried about my journalism friends making a living. I’m concerned about journalistic standards and the web. I’m excited about the potential of the internet to deliver content and relevant and timely ideas.

But it will feel very strange on Friday to anticipate the daily paper, The Ann Arbor News, and realize it is never coming again. The end of this era. Strange but true.

My small triathlon

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

I have something to prove to myself. It is about being 50, it is about my mom being so weak and sick when she was 50, it is about my brother being seriously ill, it is about my health problems with severe anemia for so many years, ending in 2001.

I have found that I have to exercise. If I don’t my blood sugar is wacky, I don’t sleep as well, and I just don’t feel good. Being active feels great. And the threshold of “good” to “great” comes at about an hour a day, 5-7 days a week. So I do it. Because I have to, because I want to, because I like it.

Last week was a bit more extreme. I figure I went from the approx. 6-7 hours a week of good exercise to about 30, In three “events”. First was the Baseline Lake Swim. A mile long, it took just over an hour. That felt great. I swam a couple times the day before, but this was the first long swim of the year. The next day was the bike ride from Chelsea to Ann Arbor. There was the trip to the start point, about 4 miles, the back and forth to downtown Chelsea, and the actual ride from Chelsea to the Townie Party. So something over 20 miles, about 2 1/2 hours.

Walking and biking and other activity the next few days, then Friday and Saturday about 10 hours of paddling each day. And not just la-dee-dah float down the river, but hard maneuvering steering pushing and pulling the water to put the canoe in the right place. Hard work.

The plan was to finish the canoe trip with a bike ride, (about 27 miles) and I had to give that up so that someone would be alert enough to drive. I remain disappointed in that, but it was the logical best choice.

So three different sports, all a little on the side of extreme, or at least slightly pushing it for the normal sort of active person. I like it. I wish I had 30 hours every week to have that much fun, to be that active, to prove something to myself.

I did it.

And it felt good, and it felt like I could do more.

I feel a little awkward talking about it. I don’t really mean to brag, but I also am feeling pretty proud. I’ve always had the sense of failure in my athletic and physical abilities. That’s what I grew up with. I pretty much like this feeling of not failing, of actually being strong and able. It makes me look at and think about my body in different ways. Good ways. Happy ways.

What made the mini-triathlon possible was the participatory nature. I wasn’t alone for any of it. Doing the swim, the bike ride and then the canoe trip with great company and support made the difference. So I’m looking forward to more community based athletic challenges, that fit within my range of what I can do. And I’ve also found that just hanging out with people who find this to be NORMAL is a huge obstacle overcome as well.

Thanks to everyone who was part of my active week!

Canoe trip to the Betsie River

Sunday, July 19th, 2009

Another Canoe trip with Gary. This time we went some distance to a river, and planned to both canoe and bike. Drop the bikes at the end, drive to the beginning and leave the truck, then come back on bike and drive to the canoe. Well, it was a good plan.

This trip was high on expectations on what we could accomplish, and low on knowledge about what we would find. Luckily, the beauty and serenity of the area was much more than I expected, and the timing was way off as to what we could do.

The drive north started with a parking lot traffic jam on US 23 so we jumped ship and went up Whitmore Lake Rd. to 36 and around on dirt roads – added a lot of time to the trip. We got in late enough that we just went straight to Frankfort to drop off the bikes at the Marina next to Betsie Lake, then to a DNR campground down a long dirt road to just above the Grass Lakes Flooding dam.

We had eaten dinner in the truck on the way, so set up, and to sleep. I had just gotten a new mosquito netting canopy from Bivouc, so we tried it out and slept under the stars except it was pretty cloudy and lots of trees. The frogs were loud and persistent all night long. But a pleasure to be out with no tent, by the river, and there were hundreds of frustrated mosquitoes. That’s a good thing.

An early start, with scrambled eggs augmented by dandelion, plantain, and grape tendrils. We left the truck by the sign-in station, paid a fee to cover the night as well as leaving the truck, and canoed a few minutes before the first portage.

That was quick and easy, and then we were down the river.

This is a very bendy twisty river! The water was over all a bit low, so we were all over the river picking out the high water spots, then also navigating around hundreds of trees, (thousands of trees?) and then the natural twists and turns of the river. It may be a 45 mile river, but I imagine we went at least twice that far since we crossed back and forth from bank to bank all day long.

That added a few hours to the time it took to paddle.

The upper part is considered the easy stretch as well. It was slow, well maintained (nearly all trees had been cut so there was some passage) but we never really knew where we were. We kept waiting for Thompsonville, and realized finally we had passed it far far back.

The river changed back and forth from gravel to sand to clay and back. It began with the lovely long weeds all pulling downstream, few rocks, and very clear clean water. The trees were also changeable, we saw tall tall aspens, lovely cedar forests, maple forests, hugely tall cliffs, and also the low marshes.

A highlight the first day was finding a bank with ripe wild strawberries mixed with red raspberries. The strawberries were immediately eaten, the red raspberries saved for later pie. Gary loves black raspberries more than anyone I’ve ever known, we didn’t find a one. But later we found abundant service berries as well, and the birds had not eaten them. We filled a container of berries.

Looking over some cattails more closely, we discovered chocolate mint growing with them. Picked a bunch of that and meant to make tea later, but instead they came home with me. It was a great pick me up smell though as I got tired.

St. John’s Wort was everywhere and in bloom. It was great to see one of my favorite plants so present. I already had lots at home making oil and tincture, so I just picked a bit for pleasure.

We just kept paddling and paddling, eating fruit and nuts and drinking lots, so lunch was very late. Avocado sandwiches were welcome with some homemade mustard Gary made from poor man’s pepper plant, and some homemade vinegars and other tasty ingredients. All on homemade sourdough bread I had made the day before. That was when about the only photos were taken, Gary had a quick nap while did a little texting and tweeting. Recharged, we headed on for a few more hours until we were in the state forests and found a place to pull the canoe up for camping.

Once again, it was a place made more lovely by the total lack of ANYONE else on the river. But why? Sure it was Thursday, but I’m constantly amazed that i end up doing things and being places that no one else is doing or being. The second day we found a few paddlers in tin cans, the obligatory cooler of beer. A few more serious kayakers, and maybe four people fishing – one woman. That’s on almost 45 miles of river. As we got closer to Frankfort, more and more tents on the river banks, but even then only about 6-7.

We found a great place to camp, not to much poison ivy, and a walk revealed ramps in flower and we dug up a few. This was after dinner, or they would have gone into the pot. Tomato soup, with potatoes, zuchini, and onion. And an array of spices from Gary’s camping supply.

Birds are a huge part of every canoe trip, and we had the usual Great Blue Heron flying ahead of us down river. Lots of Little Green Herons, Cedar Wax Wings may have been the most prevalent, and Gary spotted the amazing Piliated Woodpecker flying over us. There were two, I saw them as odd shaped fat looking big birds, he got the positive ID. We had just gone by some of their obvious holes in the trees, so I was hoping to see them and knew they were around.

Of course many ducks – the shy wood ducks, the common ducks, and a lot of what he called a Blue WInged Teal Duck. We chased a lot of those down the river as well.

We also saw a few muskrats and evidence of beaver activity, one really large piled up house. Looked like a lot of work! We’re pretty sure we saw two river otters, slow, sleek, moving very unlike a muskrat. Very early on a deer broke out of the woods and jumped across the water to the other shore just a bit in front of us. Wow!

A creature that sure looked like a mink was on the other shore as we set up camp the second night. We had no trouble with animals in camp, and the second night we started out under the mosquito netting again. Just as it was beginning to get light, the rain started, and got very intense even with the trees above us. Gary acted fast, leaped up and set up the tent, I got really cold really fast, and was glad to crawl in to that shelter and get warm again. He had also set up the pie almost ready to bake the night before, so that it was just a matter of adding berries to the crust, some thickener, and some sweetener. I had brought agave syrup for that. So he assembled the pie, and cooked it just outside the tent using his baking set up.

It wasn’t long before it was ready. Breakfast — service berry red raspberry and blueberry (I brought those) pie with forest made crust. Wow. Sitting in the tent as the rain finished, eating this wonderful creation bit by bit, anticipating another long day on the water, that was truly a high point for me.

We packed up the wet stuff, and headed off. We were still fast and strong, which was good because we were only half way to Frankfort and the bikes, The river flows southwest then curves north and west, and the second half is considered the more challenging.

Now I understood how easily we could tip being caught up on some log or brush, and either panicking or making the wrong move. We also had a few totally blocked passages. We were able to just go over a few logs by speed and pushing over. But we came to one were the canoe would fit, but no people. So I did my first climb over the log and let the boat go under.

Later the portage around a total log block was unlikely – undercut high bank on the left, marsh and wetlands on the right. A lot of logs were all jammed tight against an extra large one, but enough of a platform that I felt very comfortable getting out, helping Gary pull the loaded canoe over, and then getting back in. Another skill learned and practiced!

Gary did one on his own while I filmed from the bank. A newly downed tree with full live foliage, the canoe went under, Gary climbed over, then picked me up on shore.

Reading the river got easier, naturally reacting to steering became the norm, and also understanding Gary’s moves finally came clearer. Finding water deep enough was a continual process, I even began to understand where to go and find it. And see it.

It rained a bit the second day, and was cold and cloudy until late afternoon. We were working hard enough it wasn’t much of an issue, but I had not dressed or prepared for cold. Another lesson learned.

The only other dam, at Homestead, was a pretty easy portage, and we sat and ate peanut butter sandwiches, as well as cheese and mustard sandwiches. People kept showing up, watching the dam overlook, and leaving, one guy wanted to talk about canoeing so Gary did that while I walked down river and found a private place to pee.

After a day and a half in the wilds 1/2 dozen or so people seem like a crowd… nice to not have other people around and no canned music, only trees and green stuff to look at. There were a few houses, and one spot with a lot of RVs parked right on the edge. But mostly isolated “log” cabins (made from processed lumber — too uniform to be real to my eye) and busted up docks.

Some serious erosion every once in a while, some of the houses clearly looked in danger. And some were way high on cliffs. Gary enjoyed the many swings (like on m front porch) on stands right on the edge of some of the cliffs. You want that swing to be moored in, and you can’t jump of!

I ended up spending a few hours singing every song I could think of. I just liked the sound in the wild areas, and it was nice to slowly focus on breathing and resonance and sing with the rhythm of paddling and watching. It just felt good, and Gary didn’t object, so that was a pleasure. Fok songs, protest songs, Monkees, Beatles, a very odd assortment I’d say.

We took more breaks the second day, needed them. But that also meant we took out at almost 7 pm in Frankfort. The river end did remind me of the Huron near lake Erie. More open marshes, no more towering trees and forests, more islands and snaking tributaries coming in from all sides. There was also more wind and waves.

We had a long but pretty easy paddle into the lake, but had fortified ourselves on the first bridge before the lake with dinner. Cold beans, wrapped in tortillas with hot sauce. The Fig Newmans, chocolate, most of the fruit, the nuts, and other food was gone.

We found the bikes, took out at the public marina there, and Gary went off on bike for the truck. Our thinking was that he would be able to ride much faster without me, and someone (me) would need to be a bit awake for the long drive home.

About 2 1/2 hours later, a tired and in his own words “loopy” Gary pulled in. I was getting cold and just beginning to worry. No worries. Loaded, he got an ice cream, I had done my chocolate peanut butter cone a few hours before.

We made the drive but were both really tired, it took a lot of focus to be safe and also keep going.

I’ll blog more details later. Just wanted to get some basics down early.

Wildcrafting posts including Northern Trip

Sunday, July 19th, 2009

You can follow me on twitter, or read the tweets here. I post every 10 tweets.

# wildcrafting
Yarrow bug repellent worked well in the woods. Lasts a short time tho. Yarrow flower tops in vodka, 6 wks, strain dilute w/ H2O, spray on.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
About 30 people wandered through the wildcrafting class during Reskilling festival, 15 stayed, most new to actually eating wild foods. Fun.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Further north not only is St. John’s Wort in perfect bloom but it is also everywhere. Saw more of that than almost any other flower.about 8 hours ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
picking service berries and red raspberries from a canoe for later pie. Lots of them on the river.4:30 PM Jul 17th from txt

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
found wild strawberries n of a2. Th best treat. Wild chocolate mint for later tea and stir fry seasoning.4:28 PM Jul 17th from txt

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Still collecting wild chive, garlic, onion greens – chop and dry in low oven 200 degrees for 2 hours, turn off, leave overnight. Put in jars12:56 PM Jul 16th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
I’ll have photos happening once I’m blogging for annarbor.com That goes live next week – I’ll send out the link. These tweets with details.7:34 PM Jul 15th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Plantain is easy to ID just now, it is in flower and then seed. Look in the grass, straight up stalks with tiniest white flowers, 4-6 inches7:33 PM Jul 15th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Free Herbal Wisdom Class- Herbal First Aid & Prevention for Your Pet. Thurs July 23, 7-8:30 Crazy Wisdom. PFC sponsors, Linda Diane teaches7:32 PM Jul 15th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Basics – dandelion leaves. Some are bitter, some are less. Add to salad or pot greens. High in vit A, calcium + minerals, liver nourisher.

Community Events

Monday, July 13th, 2009

I’ve been part of three very varied and pretty significant community events yesterday and today. Certainly worth noting, and also celebrating events that are intended to build community, acknowledge the importance of community, and to just have fun as a group.

The Annual Huron River Watershed Council Baseline Swim was Sunday morning. Over 40 people swam, and then there were kayakers, canoeists, and a few others in boats to keep us safe. I love it when the motor boats appear in the channel, rev up for a high speed launch into the lake, and the sheriff roars over and stops them dead in their tracks. Yeah!! Swimmers win for that one hour.

Some used the swim as a race, and some of us just enjoyed the perfect morning. I wasn’t the last this year. But I was the slowest. The last to finish got in the water well after me!

So I swam a mile, and loved it.

Today, I joined Mark Braun for his Joybox Express bike ride from Chelsea to Ann Arbor to the Townie Party before the Art Fairs. It was a great ride, straight down Jackson Road, all the way to Main Street. More than 25 people took part. We caused some back up going through the construction on Jackson, but that was also the point!

I dive my truck to the lake with some stuff and my bicycle. I left the truck there, and took off on my bike to Aberdeen Bike Store, where the group ride would begin. I was cruising down the wide shoulder of M-52 in my highest gear, and when I went to shift to an easier gear it wouldn’t shift. And it just wouldn’t. I got off and tried to do it manually, no luck. So I biked into and through town unable to shift.

I feared I would miss the ride, but a sweet guy at the Aberdeen Bike shop immediately set to work, diagnosed the problem, put on a replacement shifter, and hardly charged me. And said if I didn’t have the money with me I could come back and pay for it. Fabulous service. And the shifter works better than ever! And what immense luck, to have it break on the way to a bike store. I’m very lucky.

The third event was the townie party. A much more massive thing — but similar idea and energy. I enjoy it until I got too tired to stay longer. But I was grinning like a mad woman from how good it felt to do the ride.

Inspiration, fun, connections made, and a very feel good experience from all three events. And it is so much fun to bike or swim or hike (or parade!) with a bunch of people. I really enjoyed these events. I feel tired and well used.

I do love Ann Arbor (and nearby as well…)

Wildcrafting another 10 posts

Monday, July 13th, 2009

I’m enjoying the routine of 1-2 posts a day on wildcrafting. Keeps me in touch with something fun, that I care about, and that can inspire other people.

Here are the next ten tweets, you can follow me on twitter wildcrafting

1.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingSome Lamb’s Quarters are already beginning to be a little tough unless you’ve been picking regularly. Still edible, just cook a few minutes.less than 5 seconds ago from web

2.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingBiking and walking are the two best ways to find wild food. You have to slow down to be a forager. And watch. And stop often.less than 5 seconds ago from web

3.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingMotherwort flowering tops made into tincture for menopause transition & help regular cycles (menses and heart rhythm). Peek harvest ending7:59 PM Jul 12th from web

4.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingI unexpectedly made a housecall and was offered homemade pizza with wildcrafted dried morel mushrooms as a topping. Wild foragers!7:47 PM Jul 12th from web

5.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingAn abundance of black raspberries, an abundance of BRB tweets. Technology follows nature. About to indulge in some non-wild blueberries tho.9:35 PM Jul 11th from web

6.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingA friend shared black raspberry ice cream with me 2day. Wow. He also has BRB wine, and is trying BRB soda – brewed like root beer. Creative.9:33 PM Jul 11th from web

7.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingQueen Ann’s lace is blooming – seems early. That’s a second year wild carrot. Not much for food or medicine, seeds were used 4 birth control9:31 PM Jul 11th from web

8.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingblack raspberries in cornbread, crisps, fruit leather, jam, dried, pies, oatmeal, yogurt, smoothies, milk shakes, and of course just plain.8:32 PM Jul 10th from txt

9.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting1st year wild carrot before the flower. Make sure it smells like carrot. Root in salads or add to stir frys roast veggies.7:43 PM Jul 10th from txt

10.
Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingPicking Mulberries into a NYT bag. My dog is scarfing them up off the ground as fast as she can. They go into the freezer, in zip lock bag.8:29 PM Jul 9th from web

Wildcrafting on Twitter

Thursday, July 9th, 2009

Follow my wildcrafting updates

Here are the last ten posts.

# wildcrafting
Picking Mulberries into a NYT bag. My dog is scarfing them up off the ground as fast as she can. They go into the freezer, in zip lock bag.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
There are some interesting and prolific mushrooms the SW corner of the upper level of Bach Big Playground. Have no idea what they are. Pass.less than 5 seconds ago from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
What is your plant IQ? Beginner foragers need to be *much* more cautious until you learn how to see, smell & taste the difference in plants7:27 PM Jul 8th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcraftingBlack Raspberries and Mulberries are still coming in strong. 2 of us picked almost 2 gallons this morning. Make a date with a friend!6:17 PM Jul 8th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Bee Balm – Bergamont – has a large window when leaves can be picked. Dry & use in place of oregano. Best before flowering, but OK even then.12:41 PM Jul 7th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Google “Poor Man’s Pepper” or the latin, Lepidium virginicum Taste it – it may take 10 seconds for the pepper taste to hit your tongue7:42 PM Jul 6th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
“Poor Man’s Pepper” the grn seed pods are peppery. Use fresh or dry for later use. Photos – link on my blog http://lindadianefeldt.com/…7:38 PM Jul 6th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Pickled roots are tasty as a snack, or cook with. Vinegar will have + minerals – use in salad dressings, condiments, over rice dishes, etc1:05 PM Jul 5th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
As you dig out those 1st yr burdock and dandelion roots – wash, place in jar cover with apple cider vinegar, use plastic lid, wait 2-4 wks1:04 PM Jul 5th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
And yes, you can find exploding Jewel weed seed pods on the taller plants (about waist high) right now. Later tweets will tell about eating.10:39 PM Jul 4th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Jewel weed juice – add to a salve, freeze, use for skin irritations, rashes, poison ivy. Your exploding plant in honor of 4th of july.10:30 PM Jul 4th from web

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Linda Diane Feldt
wildcrafting
Are there exploding plants? Jewel weed seed pods explode when touched. Juice the plant, carefully pick & throw a pod at a friend. Have fun.