Archive for the ‘soups’ Category

More Tweets – Just Two more to catch up

Monday, January 18th, 2010

This and another 40 or so will put me up to date on my missing tweets. Follow me on twitter.com/wildcrafting for daily updates.

Harvesting gets more and more scant – but roots are still a great feast. Burdock (look for leaves with no flower stalks), dandelion are 2 9:27 PM Nov 27th, 2009
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When you harvest for bark, take vertical strips. If you gird the tree (go around) it dies. Except cork trees. But that is not a local tree! 6:39 AM Nov 25th, 2009
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we have slippery elms around here, but I’ve never harvested from them. Bark is powdered and used to stop colds, sooth colon, nutritious. 6:38 AM Nov 25th, 2009
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Just sniffed oil drops on surgical gauze. A bit formal – but some concessions can be made for the setting. Totally completely effective. 8:36 PM Nov 22nd, 2009
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Used peppermint oil to control post-surgery nausea. Read studies that said it worked, 1st and only chance to try. Amazing. Would wild mint? 8:31 PM Nov 22nd, 2009
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Using st. john’s wort oil topically to keep shingles at bay. Made from flowering tops gathered in June, farmer’s field. In Olive oil. Works. 8:29 PM Nov 22nd, 2009
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witch hazel grows in clumps of small trees. This must be ornamental var. as friend says he saw only one tree. And it fruits b4 it flowers. 11:40 PM Nov 21st, 2009
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friend walking my dog came back with witch hazel flower. blooms in Nov. fringy thin yellow petals. not edible but tinctured for astringent. 11:36 PM Nov 21st, 2009
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home from hosp day early – oatmeal made with maple sap – not syrup frozen from last season. And black rasp. No hosp. food at all. 12:50 PM Nov 21st, 2009
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No more tweets until Sunday at the earliest. Combining the best of conventional and alternative therapies, to be nourished and heal fast. 9:44 PM Nov 18th, 2009
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Woods today filled with young garlic mustard. Bad. And young strawberry plants – promise of good things in the spring. Good. 9:42 PM Nov 18th, 2009
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catnip is making a go of growing in this warm weather. Herbal tea, dry for cats, add to cooking greens for flavor change. Soothes stomach. 1:24 PM Nov 18th, 2009
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It took about 2 weeks for my root cellar to stop smelling like dead mice. The down side to food storage. Those mice are amazing. Destroyers. 9:50 AM Nov 18th, 2009
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I think I will miss the woods more than anything. Good motivation to get well soon. I just can’t be inside too long.. lots grows in the cold 9:46 PM Nov 17th, 2009
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Hope to be back next week, posting ideas, recipes, philosophy, info on medicinal herbs, and herbs I’m using to nourish and heal. 9:44 PM Nov 17th, 2009
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I will be indoors for a week or two recovering from major abdominal surgery. It may be hard to twitter about wild things for a bit. 9:42 PM Nov 17th, 2009
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Lots of dandelions. Craving tahini. Combines well – recipe http://moonfieldpress.com/pages/samplerecipes.html from my cookbook. 9:41 PM Nov 17th, 2009
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Burdock root infused overnight, strained and used in baths for soothing skin care, for itching and luxurious sensations. Freeze 4 later use 11:30 PM Nov 15th, 2009
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tomorrow – final comfrey leaf harvest. For herbal vinegar 4 minerals, and decoction to preserve by freezing. Wound healing used externally. 11:27 PM Nov 15th, 2009
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Soup made from Jerusalem artichokes, chestnuts, garlic and brussel sprouts. Pureed artichokes, 40 cloves garlic for 3 gallons. Tasty. 11:06 PM Nov 15th, 2009
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Long walk but not much to eat. Comfrey still growing strong. My bees are a bit troubled, warm weather but no flowers. That’s hard for them. 5:00 PM Nov 14th, 2009
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Still avail. roots of dandelion, burdock, chicory, wild carrot; yellow dock leaves (think pesto); apples, crabapples; acorns, black walnuts 9:05 PM Nov 13th, 2009
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Did more talking about wildcrafting than doing it today. Encouraging urban maple syruping, listing wild plants still harvestable. 9:02 PM Nov 13th, 2009
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Tincture of St. John’s Wort oil is ruby red, just beautiful. Used for shingles, nerve pain, anti-viral, and Seasonal Affective Disorder more 9:32 PM Nov 12th, 2009
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Productive day dealing with previous preparations. Decanted St. John’s Wort oil and tincture, vinegars of pine and comfrey, echinacea tinct. 9:30 PM Nov 12th, 2009
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Evidence for Echinacea in small doses all anecdotal. My published article http://www.holisticwisdom.org/hwpages/echinacea.html 8:33 AM Nov 11th, 2009
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Taking home made Echinacea purpurea tincture daily – 10 drops in water – as prevention against misc. viruses. Made from roots, 3 YO plants 8:31 AM Nov 11th, 2009
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Drinking nettle leaf infusion – eating dandelion leaves – enjoying yellow dock leaf pesto – wild pears – ground cherries not ripening 8:29 AM Nov 11th, 2009
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And, sometimes conventional medicine is necessary and profoundly helpful. Best solution? Combine the two. Alt. and Conv. 8:28 AM Nov 11th, 2009
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Health Insurance nightmares interfere with life & happiness, including posting on wild food. Sorry! Do it yourself medicine is more peaceful 8:26 AM Nov 11th, 2009
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Use dried rosehips with other herbs for tea, infuse with lid 20 minutes or a couple hours. Nice color, taste, and vit. C. 9:00 AM Nov 8th, 2009
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Found some rosehips? You can dry them. Dry the flesh, not the seeds, on a tray in any airy warm place. Store in jars with lid. 8:59 AM Nov 8th, 2009
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The Nov. Herbal Wisdom class has been postponed. It will be January 28th, on using herbs for cancer and heart disease. 8:57 AM Nov 8th, 2009
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Rosehips – nibble on the red flesh, avoid the barbed seeds inside. Great source of Vit. C 3:24 PM Nov 7th, 2009
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Canoeing – found a few rosehips to nibble. Not much else, so just enjoyed the warm sunny weather and being on the water. 3:23 PM Nov 7th, 2009
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If they’ve been frosted, it will be too late. Not the right flavor to spend time preserving. 11:42 PM Nov 6th, 2009
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I will be looking for unfrozen garlic greens and chives tomorrow. Forget to dry some for the winter. 200 degree oven, into well sealed jar. 11:41 PM Nov 6th, 2009
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Ignite2 went well, love to talk about wildcrafting with people who never considered it, or who remember their g-mother doing it. 11:40 PM Nov 6th, 2009
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As of this moment, just 32 free tickets left for ignite2 http://igniteannarbor.eventbrite.com/ So about 500 people will be there. Cool. 12:08 AM Nov 6th, 2009
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I am explaining my motivation and passion for this twitter experiment at Ingite2, Friday night, 7 pm. 5 minutes, 20 slides, auto advance 12:06 AM Nov 6th, 2009
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Eat ‘chokes raw like water chestnuts, baked and mashed with potatoes, boiled in soups, stir fried is awesome, very versatile. Nutritious 2 5:18 PM Nov 5th, 2009
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I’ll put some in sand in the root cellar. Last year the mice got to them, this year taking measures against mice so there is hope. 5:17 PM Nov 5th, 2009
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To store Jer. Art. don’t remove the dirt, put in plastic bags in the produce drawer of your refrig, I’ve had some last almost a year. 5:16 PM Nov 5th, 2009 *****
Harvested about 30 pounds of Jerusalem Artichokes. They are kind of wild – they grow where I don’t want them and come back every year. 5:15 PM Nov 5th, 2009

Artichokes and Chestnuts

Friday, November 13th, 2009

i don’t know what made me want to combine the two, then I wanted to add garlic, and after I started cooking it decided on brussel sprouts as well. So yes, this was one of my weirder soups. But I was very happy with the final results!

I had two jars of chestnuts I’ve been saving for a special occasion. I had just dug up Jerusalem Artichokes. And it is the season for garlic – stave off colds and flue. And I still have a lot of brussel sprouts left that I picked a few weeks ago.

I started with about 4 cups of washed and chopped artichokes in my large soup pot, and plenty of water. I let that cook for about 30 minutes. I blended it with my stick blender. I added the two jars of chestnuts, also chopped. I peeled and coarsely chopped about 40 cloves of garlic, about two cups. All of that was added to the pot. I washed and halved brussel sprouts, and added them. That larger ones were quartered. That all cooked about an hour. A little salt and pepper was added, and a pinch of bergamont.

Once the chestnuts easily fell apart, the soup was done. Very rich, simple, mellow taste.
I was uncertain fro a bit, but liked it a lot in the end. There is a single bowlful left. So that was a hit!

Now that was fun

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

A warm spring night, just over a dozen friends on the front porch, a vegetable tomato based soup, freshly made sourdough bread with homemade butter, and a bit of a birthday treat of strawberries and mangoes with improvised chocolate sauce.

There was actually a lot of traffic on the court last night, with friends visiting everyone on the street. There was room for sitting and standing as people came and went. The bees were visited by nearly everyone, and we were all glad they seem so happy and —- busy. Like bees are supposed to be.

The soup was simple, but yet got rave reviews from a couple of people. Sauted chopped onions, add carrots, broccoli, celery and quartered mushrooms. 1 can each pureed and diced tomatoes, a can of garbonzos borrowed from my neighbor, salt, freshly crushed pepper, a bit of chili powder – and the critical ingredient freshly ground cumin.

The chocolate sauce was inspired by the thought of ripe mangoes and one of my many friends named Laura brought organic strawberries. A few minutes later I made a roux of fresh ground flour and butter, added some cream off the top of a jug of milk, a handful of chocolate chips and a couple tablespoons of cocoa powder, and a tablespoon of raw sugar. It had a few lumps but capped the meal. Add in a candle standing up in a bowl of strawberries, and that gave us the inspiration to sing happy birthday to Gary.

Nala had her stuffed kong, and this time I had the foresight to stick it in the freezer so it lasted far longer. It was full of some very old cashew butter and kibble. She didn’t get to steal any food from anyone.

I suppose this is the third “season” of Friday dinners, and I enjoyed it totally. Taking a few breaks was good, inviting more people even better. And even though it was great to hang out here in warm weather, being at the lake is even more so.

“You will always be surrounded by true friends” is my Treo generated fortune of the day. Couldn’t be more true. Although “surrounded” may be open to interpretation. Three of the people who came last night will be in California in just a few short months, 2 1/2 months actually. One by one the “last time” events with each of them are passing. That’s hard.

I’m certainly finding a lot of new friends recently, but those people who have been here for a while, we’ve been through times together, we know each other’s hard stories, those are special friends. And it is harder when they are further away. Not as easy to go out for Zingerman’s chocolate cheesecake on the spur of the moment. Or a walk. Or dinner on the porch.

But the pull to visit California soon grows stronger!

Rice Soup

Friday, March 13th, 2009

Tonight I really started from nothing, and ended up with a tasty soup. I was just thinking rice. So I started that cooking. There was garlic laying around, so that seemed good to add. I had leeks that needed to be used, and I added an onion as well. So far 2 cups rice, 3 cloves garlic (slivered in chunks) two leeks (sliced), and once large onion (chopped). That was well on its way when I thought beans would be good, so I added about a cup of dry lima beans I had in a jar on the shelf. I wanted to add some cabbage, but it was too far gone so that was compost. Instead, some nice broccoli (three stalks) was added about an hour before I wanted to serve. After the broccoli, I put in a generous amount of vegetarian bouillon (2 tbsp?) and let it cook for another hour or so.

All this with enough water to fill the soup pot, more added as the rice and beans absorbed it.
It was a tasty concoction, with good amount of rice and veggies in every spoonful. There were 13 for dinner, and I have a bit of soup to freeze.

I made a huge pile of baking soda biscuits, very quick and easy, made from buckwheat and whole wheat. Recipe from my old Laurel’s Kitchen. They are a treat. I was able to freeze a few dozen. There are lots of ways to reheat them and combine with other leftovers. I discovered that making them with home made butter is easy – the butter was crumbly, I would have normally rinsed it and packed it, I just used it before that step and it was simple to blend it with the pastry cutter,

It is also easier to roll out biscuits with a glass rather than a rolling in. Less likely to stick. then simply turn the glass and cut the biscuits with the same glass.

It was a good night. I was a bit stressed out from the events of the week and teaching, cooking and having people over helps. Tomorrow I have left over soup and biscuits and time for a long walk in the woods. I hope to find and harvest a bit of garlic mustard, and start eating and preserving some of that green. Perhaps adding the fresh garlic mustard to the remaining frozen kale. Sort of a leap frogging of greens into the next season!

Recipe – Squash and Nettle Soup

Saturday, March 7th, 2009

Last night I came up with another winner. It looked like one of those healthy green soups that end up tasting more green than anything, but it was a surprise.

The mice and temp variations have finished off most of the fruit cellar remains. Oh well. I learned a lot, and not too much was lost. But three squash remained – a butternut, a hubbard, and an acorn. I split them in half, removed the seeds and pulp, and baked them 350 for an hour, cut side down, with parchment paper (helps a lot with cleanup).

In my large soup pot (about 2 1/2 gallons) I carmelized a large onion in some olive oil — cooked it about 10 minutes so it was just browning. Added water and the pulp from the squash. I cooked that for about 15 minutes, then added about two cups of frozen nettles picked and blanched last may.

After the nettles had thawed, I used my stick blender to blend the whole thing in the pot. Not totally, but pretty smooth. Added a bit of cinnamon, and served.

The results was a sweet tasting soup, with a darker base. The nettles were pretty as well as adding that wild green flavor that blended perfectly with the sweet. I think dandelions would be a great substitute, collards or kale picked late in the fall or winter, or maybe spinach.

It was well received by everyone, and some leftover in the freezer for later enjoyment. Simple, and healthy and very tasty.

Fruit Cellar update

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

Well, the pears are finished. I scooped out 7 pretty ratty looking hard skinned remainders from a mostly dessicated group, and they still taste fabulous. Amazing, fresh pears in February!
The mice found the apples, and the whole lot needs to be thrown out. And measures against mice taken. So this week I’ll clean up that mess. Live and learn. The squash seem to be fine, the Jerusalem Artichokes are losing moisture – haven’t done a taste test but they seem mixed as far as able to enjoy them.

The rest is stored in jars, so no trouble there. Just really convenient to have that extra storage for empty jars, bulk storage (I bought 50 pounds of oatmeal, 50 pounds of wheat berries, 25 pounds of corn) and normally I have it on top of the refrig or have to stagger those orders. I’ll get some rice and beans and more now that I have the storage space.

I’m thinking lots of winter squash for next year. Squash may be the dominant veggies in the garden. I’m eating the summer squash I cooked up and froze, a favorite. I ate the last of the kale direct form the garden last Friday, and now its time to start on the frozen. There are nettles in there as well, I haven’t stared on those. What started as abundance of berries is shrinking really fast. I only found one bag of blueberries left last night – so either they are hiding or I seriously misjudged quantity there.

There is a huge amount of pesto, made from weeds, so I’m working on more regular use of that. And I’m building up the soup supply but most of it is getting eaten every Friday. But I am doing a better job than usual remembering to EAT what I put aside.

The roasted garlic last week – a huge bag was a much appreciated gift form a new friend – has been a delight to add to many things. The best was a left over mac and cheese dish with lots of roasted garlic, and pesto added just as it came out of baking in the oven. Oh wow.

Love the fruit cellar. Sorry I have to start ousting the mice. But I don’t want to share.